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Ringnews24 Hall of fame Nominations - Modern fighters


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Ringnews24 Hall of Fame - nominate your fighter

 

If you had one pick of all the boxers there's ever been , who would you let in and why?

 

What rules should we consider?

 

We'll do a vote for each fighter nominated and make our own list up

 

should get some interesting views .............................

 

1 boxer is only to be allowed per member , so dont duplicate someone elses vote but you may add extra as to why they should be allowed.

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Please nominate a fighter from the last 30 years.

Edited by the_budweiser
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Julio Cesar Chavez: His record stands at 107-6-2 (86 KOs). He went 87-0 before he drew with Pernell Whitaker which is the longest win streak in boxing history. He was 89-0-1 before he lost to Frankie Randall. In the bout he was knocked down for the first time in his 14 year career. However, he would later beat Frankie Randall TWICE.

 

He was undefeated for 13 years, holds records for most successful consecutive defences of world titles (27), most title fights (37), most title fight victories (31), and is tied with Joe Louis for most title defences won by KO (21).

 

Most boxing historians rank him as one of the hardest punchers of all time as well as having one of the toughest chins. A real dangerous combination.

 

He definitely deserves a place in the HOF.

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Jeff Fenech

 

Jeff Fenech (born 28 May 1964 in Marrickville, Sydney, Australia) is a retired Maltese-Australian boxer and a three time world champion who is now a boxing trainer.

 

Fenech had a stellar amateur career, which led to him representing his country at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, was the third fastest boxer to become a world champion, behind Muangsuring and Spinks, when he knocked out Shingaki in nine rounds in Sydney. Fenech retired with a record of 28 wins, 3 losses and 1 draw, with 21 wins by knockout and in his palmares has three world crown.

In retirement, Fenech has kept busy, and now he is the owner of a sports clothing brand that carries his name in Australia. In addition, he was inducted in 2002 into the International Boxing Hall Of Fame in Canastota, New York. Fenech has become a trainer training such fighters as Hussein Hussein, Sakio Bika, and former IBF flyweight champion Vic Darchinyan.

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Khaosai Galaxy

Born Khaosai Galaxy, in Bangkok, Thailand

 

The Southpaw was one of the most dominant fighters of his era and had either a 50-1 or 48-1 record (depending on your source) which included a long reign as the WBA Super Flyweight champion. Recorded 42 KO's in the weight.

 

Sadly fought very rarely out of Thailand and lacks the impressive wins so may demand of a HOF candidate.

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What rules should we consider?

If been found guilty of drugs,bribes,cheating i think they shouldn't be allowed in we want a fair hall of fame

 

my thoughts

 

It's a tough one to decide what's right.

 

On the one hand we could ban all boxers caught with any kind of drug in their system such as James Toney, Shane Mosley, Roy Jones Jr (i know he has been linked to Balco scandal).

 

But, on the other hand, these guys are those who were caught. That doesn't mean they're the only ones who have done it. Some people swear blind Pacquiao is on steroids but there's no proof. It's kind of like saying "Don't let Pacquiao in until he's done a blood test just to be on the safe side".

 

So, in theory it would be great to keep all the cheats out of the HOF (this one and the IBHOF) but it's a difficult one to debate as do we only keep out those caught and if so, isn't that unfair on them if others are also using steroids but just never been caught?

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Arturo Gatti

 

Not a modern great by any stretch of the imagination. Yet the Hall of Fame should not be about skills in my opinion. It should be about what you have done for the sport. Can anyone argue against the fact that Gatti did perhaps more for Boxing than Oscar during the late 90's early 2000's?.

 

While it can not be argued against that De La Hoya drive the casual fans in flocks to the sport, what you can not deny is that Arturo Gatti did more than any other of fighter in the same period to keep those fans.

 

Fighters such as Gatti can not be measured by their skill or titles won or their records. They must be measured by their contribution to the sport and if you ask me, Gattis contribution though his 5 fight of the year nominations is as impressive as Floyd Mayweathers unbeaten streak.

 

If you think im being a little insane just watch Floyd v Mosley from round 10, dont watch the fight, watch the fans. You would never leave a Gatti fight early.

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Rob-

 

Unless I missed him in the thread you just posted for us to check, my nominee would be Alexis Arguello. Three Division Champion back when it still meant a great deal, and always a credit to the sport with his sportsmanship and demeanor (even if he did have his demons).

 

As far as the character issue, I don't think it should play a negative role at all, we should only concern ourselves with what happened between the Ropes, but I do think that in borderline cases then maybe a few bonus points (but NOT A LOT!) could be the deciding factor for something like I mentioned above (although AA certainly doesn't have to depend on it, I wouldn't think).

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Arturo Gatti

 

Not a modern great by any stretch of the imagination. Yet the Hall of Fame should not be about skills in my opinion. It should be about what you have done for the sport. Can anyone argue against the fact that Gatti did perhaps more for Boxing than Oscar during the late 90's early 2000's?.

 

While it can not be argued against that De La Hoya drive the casual fans in flocks to the sport, what you can not deny is that Arturo Gatti did more than any other of fighter in the same period to keep those fans.

 

Fighters such as Gatti can not be measured by their skill or titles won or their records. They must be measured by their contribution to the sport and if you ask me, Gattis contribution though his 5 fight of the year nominations is as impressive as Floyd Mayweathers unbeaten streak.

 

If you think im being a little insane just watch Floyd v Mosley from round 10, dont watch the fight, watch the fans. You would never leave a Gatti fight early.

 

Some good points, especially the last point. Nobody would leave a Gatti fight early.

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Arturo Gatti

 

Not a modern great by any stretch of the imagination. Yet the Hall of Fame should not be about skills in my opinion. It should be about what you have done for the sport. Can anyone argue against the fact that Gatti did perhaps more for Boxing than Oscar during the late 90's early 2000's?.

 

While it can not be argued against that De La Hoya drive the casual fans in flocks to the sport, what you can not deny is that Arturo Gatti did more than any other of fighter in the same period to keep those fans.

 

Fighters such as Gatti can not be measured by their skill or titles won or their records. They must be measured by their contribution to the sport and if you ask me, Gattis contribution though his 5 fight of the year nominations is as impressive as Floyd Mayweathers unbeaten streak.

 

If you think im being a little insane just watch Floyd v Mosley from round 10, dont watch the fight, watch the fans. You would never leave a Gatti fight early.

 

clap// clap// clap//

 

I have seen ten times the Gatti-Ward Trilogy in HD....has the power to reconcile mine with boxing !!!

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Just to back up up my Gatti nomination I wrote this on the 1 year anniversay of his death

 

40-9 (31 KOs), A record that doesn’t tell the whole story. Arturo Gatti is a fighter that made records irrelevant. A two-time double weight World Champion also made belts irrelevant. In fact when he fought, everything was irrelevant. A year ago today Thunder was taken from us in circumstances that are as confusing today as they were a year ago.

 

“Gatti could make a fight fan out of Jesus” –Ironmike

 

As you can see by his record Gatti was never going to become an all-time great skill-wise. In fact, at times he could be quite limited, but he never gave up. In the face of insurmountable odds we started to expect him to come through them with something dramatic and impossible. If he didn’t, then we knew it would not be for want of trying.

 

Quite simply, there is not another fighter who has ever captured the hearts of fans as much as Arturo Gatti. It almost became a ritual, people who deplored violence would pay to see him fight; Despite the fact that he was not an elite fighter, he would sell out arenas even while going 6-4 in his last 10 fights.

 

Gatti will forever be remembered for his epic trilogy with Micky Ward, his brutal fights with Ivan Robinson. Practically every fight followed the same script, Gatti would start off boxing then get caught and the rollercoaster would begin. We would live the highs and lows of every fight with him. We started to take every punch he took. We threw the same punches he did, we took those beatings alongside him and shared in the elation of his wins.

 

Every time Gatti fought you knew you were going to see something special. Win or lose he would give it his all and offer no excuses, trying for every second of every round, showing huge heart, determination and an unbreakable will. Many times during his career we all thought it was over, only for him to come back in spectacular fashion, smile his famous smile and show us it was his intention all along. You knew with Gatti that you were always on the cusp of something special, you were never let down.

 

“He was like a part of the family” –Marciano_wbc

 

Michael Buffer anointed Gatti the ultimate blood and guts warrior I cant think of a title more fitting for a man who truly defined the word, “warrior.” He captured our hearts and although he had been retired for two years before his death we still feel as though he was robbed from our lives.

 

But when we look back its hard not to smile, his enthusiasm for making sure the fans got their moneys worth was second to none. He was more afraid of a boring fight than he was of losing infact so were we.

 

“20 years from now you’re all going to miss me because there will never be another Arturo Gatti” — Arturo Gatti

 

For once Gatti was wrong, we miss him already. Rest in Peace Champ and thank you for everything.

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I was going to nominate Carlos Monzn but it's getting on for 50 years since he last graced a ring.

 

So I'll have Naseem Hamed instead.

 

Say what you like about Hamed, and many of us have said plenty, but the featherweight Roy Jones set the division alight with his fast reflexes, utterly unpredictable shot selection, freakish power and wild charisma. Woth ring entrances lasting longer than some of his fights, he was a shooting star, burning brightly before crashing out of sight. His later years are tarnished by the way he handled preparation and scandals in his private life, but during his career he beat 10 world champions, won every major belt in the division, brought publicity and money raining down on the lower weight classes and even behaved like a champion after his sole defeat.

 

Like Tyson, any rejection of Hamed is generally born out of disappintment at what he could have been if only.

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Lennox Lewis, the three times Heavyweight Champion who retired at the top.

 

He beat many quality fighters like Gary Mason, Razor Ruddock, Tony Tucker, Frank Bruno, Tommy Morrison, Ray Mercer, Andrew Golota, Shannon Briggs, Zeljko Mavrovic, Michael Grant, Frans Botha, David Tua, Mike Tyson, Vitali Klitschko and Evander Holyfield. He also gained revenge for his two loses to Oliver McCall and Hasim Rahman.

 

He matches up well against any Heavyweight in history both physically and also interms of length of reign and quality of opposition. He won all domestic titles - British, Commonwealth and European before reigning on the World stage.

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