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Amateur boxing explained


The_budweiser
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Boxing at the Olympics and the Commonwealth Games falls under the jurisdiction of the sport's amateur body, the International Amateur Boxing Association.

 

That means different rules, different equipment and a different set-up to professional boxing.

 

Boxing has been contested at every Olympics since 1920 and every Commonwealth Games since 1930.

 

The competition is a knockout format, with the winner of each bout proceeding to the next round. Bronze medals will be awarded to the losers of the semi-finals.

 

AMATEUR RULES

 

Boxers, wearing either red or blue strips, must compete in protective headwear, and fights are often decided by point scoring rather than knock-out blows.

 

The gloves weigh 10 ounces and feature a white strip on the main hitting area around the knuckles.

 

Action is fast and furious as amateurs are limited to four two-minute rounds, as opposed to the customary 12 rounds in professional boxing.

 

The winner of a bout is the fighter with the most points, unless the referee stops the bout before the final bell.

 

If points are level at the end, the best and worst total score given to each fighter by the five judges is deducted.

 

The winner is the fighter who is left with the most points from the remaining three judges.

 

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/44975000/gif/_44975914_boxing_466x280.gif

 

 

 

 

GB coach Terry Edwards' guide to amateur boxing

 

Boxing at the Olympics and the Commonwealth Games falls under the jurisdiction of the sport's amateur body, the International Amateur Boxing Association.

 

That means different rules, different equipment and a different set-up to professional boxing.

 

Boxing has been contested at every Olympics since 1920 and every Commonwealth Games since 1930.

 

The competition is a knockout format, with the winner of each bout proceeding to the next round. Bronze medals will be awarded to the losers of the semi-finals.

 

AMATEUR RULES

 

Boxers, wearing either red or blue strips, must compete in protective headwear, and fights are often decided by point scoring rather than knock-out blows.

 

The gloves weigh 10 ounces and feature a white strip on the main hitting area around the knuckles.

 

Action is fast and furious as amateurs are limited to four two-minute rounds, as opposed to the customary 12 rounds in professional boxing.

 

The winner of a bout is the fighter with the most points, unless the referee stops the bout before the final bell.

 

If points are level at the end, the best and worst total score given to each fighter by the five judges is deducted.

 

The winner is the fighter who is left with the most points from the remaining three judges.

 

SCORING

 

Boxing scoring guide

 

For a boxer to score points, he must hit the head or body of his opponent, above the belt, with the knuckles of his gloves.

 

Each ringside judge has a computer scoring button to press for each boxer, and three of the five must hit their button within one second of each other for the point to register.

 

When boxers are fighting up close, called infighting, a point is awarded to the boxer with the best of the exchanges.

 

Non-scoring blows include punches that infringe the rules, punches that use any part of the glove except the knuckles, and those which do not have the weight of the body or shoulder behind them.

 

STOPPAGES

 

The referee can intervene if there is a knockout or if there has been foul play.

 

 

WEIGHT DIVISIONS

Light flyweight (48kg)

Flyweight (51kg)

Bantamweight (54kg)

Featherweight (57kg)

Lightweight (60kg)

Light welterweight (64kg)

Welterweight (69kg)

Middleweight (75kg)

Light heavyweight (81kg)

Heavyweight (91kg)

Super heavyweight (+91kg)

 

Some of the more common fouls include hitting below the belt, holding, or hitting the opponent on the back of the head, neck or body.

 

The referee will count to eight for a knockdown, which is when a boxer touches the floor or hangs onto the ropes, and 10 for a knockout.

 

He can also stop the bout if one fighter is being outclassed, receiving excessive punishment or if a certain points margin opens up between the fighters.

 

The margin for the Commonwealth Games and the Olympics is 20 points.

 

A boxer who does not comply with the instructions of the referee can be subjected to a caution, with three cautions for the same foul leading to a warning. Three warnings result in disqualification.

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On none championship bouts the computer socring system is not used and a boxing calculator is used. In this situation when it goes the distance you will have a unamimous decision or majority decision as each judge scores the bout seperately, on scoring blows.

 

I think in this respect the referee would stop the bout, as at the lower level then standing counts are more likely

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On none championship bouts the computer socring system is not used and a boxing calculator is used. In this situation when it goes the distance you will have a unamimous decision or majority decision as each judge scores the bout seperately, on scoring blows.

 

I think in this respect the referee would stop the bout, as at the lower level then standing counts are more likely

 

Sorry mate, i meant to say when it is computer scoring. I'm sure in the last olympics the overhead scoreboard showed the scores, and everyone sort of looked at it, and as soon as there was a 15 point difference, the bout was just stopped.

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On none championship bouts the computer socring system is not used and a boxing calculator is used. In this situation when it goes the distance you will have a unamimous decision or majority decision as each judge scores the bout seperately, on scoring blows.

 

I think in this respect the referee would stop the bout, as at the lower level then standing counts are more likely

 

Sorry mate, i meant to say when it is computer scoring. I'm sure in the last olympics the overhead scoreboard showed the scores, and everyone sort of looked at it, and as soon as there was a 15 point difference, the bout was just stopped.

 

I knew you meant computer scoring, I was just expanding on how amateur boxing is scored non championship bouts.

 

I have judged in fights were half way through the 2nd round the Ref has stopped it after the 4th standing count and I've had it 9-1, totally onesided.

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