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Hall Of Fame Nominee: Roberto Durán


Hall Of Fame Nominee: Roberto Durán  

  1. 1. Hall Of Fame Nominee: Roberto Durán

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Roberto Durán

 

http://www.ioffer.com/img/item/165/934/133/QOecYVW6sH3aV59.jpg

 

Boxing record

Total fights 119

Wins 103

Wins by KO 70

Losses 16

Draws 0

No contests 0

 

 

Roberto Durán Samaniego (born June 16, 1951) is a retired professional boxer from Panama, widely regarded as one of the greatest boxers of all time. A versatile brawler in the ring, he was nicknamed "Manos de Piedra" (or "Hands of Stone") during his career.

 

In 2002, he was chosen by The Ring to be the 5th greatest fighter of the last 80 years. He held world titles at four different weights—lightweight (1972–79), welterweight (1980), junior middleweight (1983–84) and middleweight (1989). He was the second boxer to have fought a span of five decades.

 

He finally retired in January 2002 at age 50 (having previously retired in 1998) following a bad car crash in October 2001, with a professional record of 119 fights, 103 wins with 70 KOs. Up until the second Ray Leonard fight, he was trained by legendary boxing trainer Ray Arcel.

 

Durán is the only man in boxing history to win fights in 5 separate decades. He registered wins in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and the 2000s.

 

History

 

Durán was born on June 16, 1951 in Panama, to a Panamanian mother and Mexican father, in the slums of El Chorrillo in a place called "La Casa de Piedra" (The House of Stone). He made his professional debut in 1968 at the age of 16.

 

First championship

 

After an initial adjustment he won thirty in a row, and scored knockout victories over future featherweight champion Ernesto Marcel and former super featherweight champion Hiroshi Kobayashi, culminating in his first title bout in June 1972, where he controversially defeated Ken Buchanan in Madison Square Garden, New York for the WBA world lightweight championship. Durán, as a 2-to-1 underdog, scored a knock down against the defending champion just fifteen seconds into the opening round and battered him throughout the bout. He was well ahead on all three cards as the bell rang to end the 13th round at which time Duran (apparently not hearing the bell due to crowd noise and the heat of the moment)continued to throw a couple of extra punches as Buchanan lay on the ropes. Upon closer inspection of the famed low blow, referee Johnny LoBianco can be seen standing behind Duran as the bell rang and immediately grabbed Duran bear-hug style to pull Duran away from Buchanan, LoBianco can clearly be seen in the video altering the direction of Duran's right arm, pulling it downward as Duran attempted to throw a clean body punch at Buchanan; thus the infamous ridicule of Duran intentionally throwing a low blow was born. Buchanan immediately dropped to the canvas writhing in pain from a groin punch, that Buchanan's trainer, Gil Clancy, said was caused by a knee to the groin (which it wasn't). Referee Johnny LoBianco awarded the fight to Durán, insisting that the blow that took down Buchanan was "in the abdomen, not any lower" (the punch did land below belt line, LoBianco was out of position to see it) and that he felt that Buchanan would be unable to continue fighting. Columnist Red Smith of The New York Times wrote that LoBianco had to award the victory to Durán, even if the punch was a low blow, as "anything short of pulling a knife is regarded indulgently" in American boxing.

 

http://www.antekprizering.com/durangonzalezpropic.jpeg

 

Duran followed up on his title winning performance with several non-title matches. Later that year, in another non-title bout, he lost a ten round decision to Esteban De Jesús. Duran got back on track with successful title defenses against Jimmy Robertson, Hector Thompson, and future lightweight champion Guts Ishimatsu. In 1974, Durán would avenge his loss to De Jesus with a brutal eleventh round knock out. In 1976, he defeated future light welterweight champion Saoul Mamby. Overall Durán made twelve successful defenses of his title (eleven coming by knock out) and amassed a record of 62-1, his last defense coming in 1978 where Durán fought a third fight with De Jesus, a unification match where Durán once again knocked out De Jesus and captured his WBC lightweight belt. Durán would give up the unified lightweight title in February 1979.

 

http://i.cdn.turner.com/sivault/multimedia/photo_gallery/0806/history.june20/images/001351764.jpg

 

Victory over Sugar Ray Leonard

 

Vacating the lightweight title was a build up for an attempt at the welterweight title. Durán earned a pair of wins against former WBC welterweight champion Carlos Palomino and Zeferino Gonzales, setting the stage for a title bout against then undefeated WBC Welterweight Champion Sugar Ray Leonard. The venue chosen would be the Olympic Stadium in Montreal, the same location where Leonard won an Olympic gold medal during the 1976 Summer Olympics. Duran resented the fact that he was getting only one-fifth the money Leonard would make despite the fact that he was entering the bout with an incredible 71-1 record. He would curse and insult Leonard during press conferences in an attempt to intimidate the young champion. On June 20, 1980, Durán captured the WBC welterweight title by defeating Leonard via a 15-round unanimous decision. The fight would become known as "The Brawl in Montreal".

 

Loss in rematch

 

In the November rematch, Durán shockingly quit. Leonard has said that his strategy was to use speed and agility to taunt and frustrate Durán, believing it was his best chance of winning the fight. In the seventh round, Leonard started to taunt Durán. His most memorable punch came late in the round. Winding up with his right hand, as if to throw a bolo punch, Leonard hit Durán flush in the face with a left. In the eighth round, Durán, slightly behind on all three scorecards, shortly after a vicious right uppercut from Leonard, turned around, walked to his corner and gave up, supposedly saying the now famous words, "no más" (no more). However, he claims to have actually said, "No quiero pelear con el payaso." (Meaning "I do not want to fight with this clown.") Another version of events has him saying, in Spanish, "I can't continue". Referee Octavio Meyran, perhaps as incredulous as was the rest of the world at what he was seeing, asked Durán if he was sure, and Durán then said, "No más, no más" (no more, no more). In violation of what any professional fighter does on the day of a fight, Durán gorged himself after the weigh-in and claimed he quit because he was having stomach cramps.[2] However, Durán's manager, Carlos Eleta, said, "Durán didn't quit because of stomach cramps. He quit because he was embarrassed. I know this."

 

Move up to middleweight

 

He took some time to recover from that fight, gaining even more weight to contend for the WBC world junior middleweight title, but losing in his first attempt at a championship in that division on the January 30 of 1982, against Wilfred Benítez by a 15 round unanimous decision. Durán was also to lose his comeback fight in December 1982 in Detroit. Kirkland Laing, from London, shocked the boxing world, producing the type of display his talents promised yet he so rarely produced, taking the split decision. After being relegated to a 10 round walk out win over Englishman Jimmy Batten at The Battle of The Champions in Miami, Durán signed with promoter Bob Arum. This marked the beginning of a comeback in which he beat former world champion and now hall of famer Pipino Cuevas via a fourth round knock-out, which earned him a second crack at the junior middleweight title, this time against WBA champion Davey Moore.

 

The WBA title bout took place at Madison Square Garden on June 16, 1983, which also happened to be Durán's 32nd birthday. The result turned out to be a one sided affair as Duran dominated Moore throughout the bout. The pro-Durán crowd at ringside cheered as Durán relentlessly punished Moore. By the end of the sixth round, Moore's eye had swollen shut and he was floored near the end of the seventh. Finally the fight was stopped in the eighth round as Moore was taking such a horrific beating and Durán won his third world title. After the victory, Durán was hoisted up in the air as the crowd sang "Happy Birthday" to a sobbing Durán.[7]

 

Durán later fought for the World middleweight title, meeting Marvin Hagler in Las Vegas in November 1983, but losing in a competitive fight that went the full fifteen rounds. Despite the loss, Durán was the first fighter to go the full distance with the great middleweight champion in one of his defenses. In June 1984, Duran was stripped of his junior middleweight title when the WBA did not approve of his fight with WBC world champion Thomas "Hitman" Hearns, and took away recognition of Durán as world champion the moment Durán stepped into the ring to box Hearns. Durán lost the fight after a vicious second round knock-out by Hearns.

 

Durán did not contend another title fight until 1989, but made the shot count when he won the WBC middleweight title from Iran Barkley in February. The fight is considered one of Duran's greatest achievements, as the 37 year old former lightweight champion took the middleweight crown, his fourth title. In a tough, back and forth fight, Durán knocked Barkley down in the eleventh round and won a close decision. The bout was named the 1989 "Fight of the Year" by The Ring. His reign was short lived once again as Duran moved up to super middleweight (although both fighters weighed in at the middleweight limit) for a third clash with Sugar Ray Leonard in December (a fight dubbed Uno Más--One More—by promoters), but lost in a decision. Duran seemed to be in decline after the fight, he attempted to win further middleweight titles in 1994, 1995 and 1996 (fighting for the minor IBC belt).

 

In 1996, he challenged Héctor Camacho for the vacant IBC Middleweight title but lost via unanimous decision. In 1997, Durán was defeated by former champion Jorge Castro. Durán fought Castro in a rematch bout and won via unanimous decision.

 

In 1998, at the age of 47, he challenged 28 year old WBA middleweight champion William Joppy. Joppy, a trim, quick-fisted fighter, battered Durán to defeat in just 3 rounds. It was Duran's most emphatic loss since the Hearns fight, over a decade earlier. Durán then announced his retirement in August 1998, but was back fighting in 1999. In June 2000, he avenged a previous loss to Pat Lawlor and claimed the NBA Super Middleweight title, but he lost the title to Héctor Camacho in a rematch bout.

 

Retirement

 

In 2001, Durán traveled to Argentina to promote a salsa music CD that he had just released. While there, he was involved in a car crash and required life-saving surgery. After that incident, he announced his retirement from boxing at the age of 50.

 

Durán's five world title belts, which he won in four different divisions, were stolen from his house in Panama in 1993 during a robbery allegedly staged by his brother-in-law, who gave them to memorabilia seller Luis González Báez, who will stand trial for trying to sell stolen goods. González Báez allegedly sold the belts to undercover FBI agents. He alleges that Durán authorized the sale of the five belts to him during a time that Durán was facing financial trouble. On September 23, 2003, a federal judge in Florida ordered the five belts returned to Durán.

 

His 70 wins by knockout place him in an exclusive group of boxers who have won 50 or more fights by knockout. He was ranked number 28 on The Ring's list of 100 greatest punchers of all time.

 

On October 14, 2006, Durán was inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame in Riverside, California, and on June 10, 2007, into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in Canastota, New York.

 

Source: wikipedia

 

Full record here: http://boxrec.com/list_bouts.php?human_id=80&cat=boxer

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Nominated by McBride

 

Roberto Duran

 

"I nominate Roberto Duran.

 

He made his debut as a 16 year old at just under 120 lbs, and in only his 29th fight became the WBA Lightweight champion of world by beating Ken Buchanan, himself a great technician.

 

He ruled the division for 5 years beating all challengers, and avenged his only defeat at the weight by knocking the guy out. Later on they had a rubber match with Duran KOing De Jesus again.

 

He then went up to Welter and took on a guy regarded definitely as the best Welter in the world, if not the best fighter, and won a UD.

 

Part of the reason i nominate Duran is due to his failures as much as his success. The way he bounced back from adversity of his own making was quite remarkable. After dismal showings in a rematch with Leonard, Britains own Kirkland Laing, and Wilfred Benitez, Roberto went in with murderous puncher Pipino Cuevas, and stopped him in four, thus earning him a title shot at Light Middle WBA champ Davey Moore who he stopped in 8 rounds to add his 3rd weight division title.

 

Not content with this Duran immediately went after one of the most feared fighters in game at that time ( Marvin Hagler ) for his Middleweight title. Lets not forget here was a guy that had had 62 fights at the time, he had drawn 2 and lost 2, all of those less than perfect marks on his resume were avenged by brutal knockout, along with another 44 victims, and all at Middleweight.

 

On paper the former Lightweight had no right to be in there, but he went 15 rounds with a very apprehensive Hagler that night, losing by 2, 1, and 1 points on the scorecards.

 

Next up came a crushing defeat to Tommy Hearns for his Light Middle title in 2 rounds, and at 33 years of age that would have been more than enough to happily retire on. World titles in 3 weight divisions when they actually meant something, unlike the cheapened versions of today.

 

Far from it, our little Panamanian wasn't finished yet, at nearly 38 years of age, and giving away 6 inches in height, and 8 inches in reach, he wins a fourth title at Middleweight against future Heavyweight Iran Barkley in what was described as Fight Of The Year in the Ring magazine.

 

From then on, unfortunately Durans career went steadily down hill, due to the combination of his age, and lifestyle, but a truly great fighter, who took inside fighting to another level."

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Roberto Duran was the best lightweight ever. 130 to 140 no one could beat him. His only downfall was that he put his body through a tremendous toll because it was normal for him to go up to 200 plus pounds then back to 140 when it was time to fight. The fact that he could cope with this type of physical stress and compete with world class fighters was amazing. At age 32 he beat a 25 year old ray leonard then moves up to a higher weight class and goes the distance with Haggler. His skin was metallic, it never cut, bruised, swelled. He was fearless and probably was the most naturally talented fighter ever in my opinion. Definite Yes.
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Roberto Duran was the best lightweight ever. 130 to 140 no one could beat him. His only downfall was that he put his body through a tremendous toll because it was normal for him to go up to 200 plus pounds then back to 140 when it was time to fight. The fact that he could cope with this type of physical stress and compete with world class fighters was amazing. At age 32 he beat a 25 year old ray leonard then moves up to a higher weight class and goes the distance with Haggler. His skin was metallic, it never cut, bruised, swelled. He was fearless and probably was the most naturally talented fighter ever in my opinion. Definite Yes.

 

Amazing!!!

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I heard tell he went through his skipping routine in training for one of his fights, and his trainer said something to him, and he did the whole thing over again, but from the position that Kossack dancers adopt, and didn't stand back up to his full hieght until he'd finished.
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Duran said something that Hatton should have taken notice of. I can't remember the exact quote but it went something like this, "You treat boxing like it's your bitch, your whore or wife. You must devote yourself to it."

 

One of the best lightweights to grace the ring. A no brainer this one.

 

Btw, on a side note, Duran is one crazy dude in real life. My mate went to his hotel room to get him to sign autographs and Duran was laughing at Harry Hill's TV burp on tv while sitting on the bed. He couldn't even understand a word of English. My mate thought Duran was going to rape him when Duran met him at the door without any keckers on! He still didn't put any on when my mate had his picture taken with him and that's plainly evident in the pic. mlol/

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Duran said something that Hatton should have taken notice of. I can't remember the exact quote but it went something like this, "You treat boxing like it's your B***H, your whore or wife. You must devote yourself to it."

 

He can't be talking about conditioning, because duran ballooned up in weight more than Hatton could ever dream of.

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Buchanan claimed a foul which may or may not be true, but Durans pressure was overwhelming him at that stage of the fight anyway.

 

 

By claiming Buchanan was kneed in the balls, his trainer weakened Ken's case. The referee might not have seen the blow land but plenty of guys at ringside did. It was a left uppercut driven deep into Buchanan's groin. Those guys also heard him roaring with the pain. They were never in any doubt about where the blow landed.It was in the nuts. Buchanan spent a good ten minutes writhing in agony before he got any sort of medical attention. Critics who says he was putting it on should check out the hospital reports. They describe swelling and bruising to Buchanan's testicles and circumcised penis which lasted for days. I defy any man on the planet to take that level of punishment without writhing. Ken couldn't have carried on that night, even if they'd given him time out. But Duran should have given him the chance to get his title back at a later date. He never did.

 

Ringnews24 members thought on the controversial moment

 

Edsel have you never watched the fight?

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Yeah, I don't doubt the injury - you can see the impact on the footage and it looks vicious, but Bcuhanan had been battered from pillar to post in that fight so it's not like he had his belt snatched away. Not sure why the rematch never happened, whether uran just didn't want it or there was some other reason.
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Yeah, I don't doubt the injury - you can see the impact on the footage and it looks vicious, but Bcuhanan had been battered from pillar to post in that fight so it's not like he had his belt snatched away. Not sure why the rematch never happened, whether uran just didn't want it or there was some other reason.

 

Durans trainer claimed there wasnt enough media interest

 

Not sure why it never happened but i did ask Ken this question in ask the star

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Buchanan claimed a foul which may or may not be true, but Durans pressure was overwhelming him at that stage of the fight anyway.

 

 

By claiming Buchanan was kneed in the balls, his trainer weakened Ken's case. The referee might not have seen the blow land but plenty of guys at ringside did. It was a left uppercut driven deep into Buchanan's groin. Those guys also heard him roaring with the pain. They were never in any doubt about where the blow landed.It was in the nuts. Buchanan spent a good ten minutes writhing in agony before he got any sort of medical attention. Critics who says he was putting it on should check out the hospital reports. They describe swelling and bruising to Buchanan's testicles and [color=yellow]circumcised penis[/color] which lasted for days. I defy any man on the planet to take that level of punishment without writhing. Ken couldn't have carried on that night, even if they'd given him time out. But Duran should have given him the chance to get his title back at a later date. He never did.

 

Ringnews24 members thought on the controversial moment

 

Edsel have you never watched the fight?

 

 

nihil ad rem

 

No not yet, slowly working my way down my list. Just added it though

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