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Can Public Negotiations Help the Mega-Bouts to Get Made?


edsel77x
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Written by Media Realease Thursday, 10 February 2011 11:29

 

Pacquiao vs. Mayweather and Haye vs. the Klitschkos Permanently Stalled and We Need the Truth:

 

As passionate boxing fans we cannot help but get caught up in the action. But more and more we seem to be transfixed with what is going on outside of the ring. The Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao negotiation fiasco has produced a clear division between fans and critics alike, and the David Haye-Klitschko circus has followed suit. It seems that as boxing fans, we feel we have an obligation to take sides. However, without knowing the real inner-workings of a negotiation process, as opposed to quotes and press releases from individuals with huge biases, we never really know the truth about what went down.

[David Haye Belts]

 

It is too easy for one fighter to simply pass blame to his opponent. We have become slightly bored with the phrases “he wanted too much money” or “he won’t take a blood test”. But beyond all of the “he said- (s)he said” nonsense there is the truth, so how do we find out what the truth is?

 

I believe the answer lies in “public” negotiations. This means each part of the negotiation process between fighters and their promotional teams is accessible to the public. Whether it be through the publication of terms of contracts and documents or simply video footage of meetings between the opposing camps. At this point, fans would probably pay a few bucks for an online video of Pacquiao vs. Mayweather - The Daylong Negotiation Battle Staredown, and it would produce more hype for the bout itself.

 

By having transparency in the negotiation process fans and the media are able to scrutinize fighters, which could hopefully put pressure on all involved to make the fight happen. So if a fighter is offered for example a 50/50 deal he will feel obliged to take the offer due to the transparency of the negotiations. If he rejects then there can be no legitimate excuse as the fans and media are mindful of the truth.

 

This idea would be unnecessary to implement for all fights, but could be highly valuable when attempting to produce so called “mega-fights” which have been very difficult to put together these days, factoring in complex politics, larger egos, insider feuds, and more. If both fighters say they want it and the fans are craving it, this method could satisfy all parties, and the entire sport of boxing would benefit as well.

 

The networks supplying the funds, be it HBO, Showtime or elsewhere, can say if you want to fight on my network, you get this fight made, and you make the negotiations public so there are no excuses. It might be that simple, although it never is in boxing.

 

A Pacquiao vs. Mayweather contest would captivate the sporting world, and a Haye vs. Klitschko bout, either Vitali or Wladimir, would reignite the stagnant heavyweight scene, the most important and prestigious weight class. Bringing the negotiations public would enable fans to more accurately gauge what is happening, and would place more onus on the fighters and promoters to make the deal.

 

Read More: http://ringnews24.com//index.php/blog/35-demo-content/4518-edsel77x.html#ixzz1DYSqqomc

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Ffs who wrote that SHIT?

 

Its bad enough all the hypocritical press release crap, never mind a media circus with the likes of Arum doing his shyster lawyer act, with the Mayweather " gangsta " fuckwits the other side of the table all ranting at each other.

 

Keep it completely behind closed doors, as it is their are enough so called fans hanging on to every word like some third rate soap opera.

 

Far better to get some kind of ombudsman type of organisation to take over, call the parties together and say these are the terms and conditions under which you will fight, and every objection realises a 10% cut in the objecting teams purse.

 

See how quickly the fighters would tell their hangers on to shut their fucking mouths then.

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Sorry, but I agree with McBride on this one. It's the Grandstanding and Public Pissing Contests in the Press that have sunk many of our major fights. It's become a case of two fights, the actual one and the PR one, and to many top flight fighters the MORE IMPORTANT OF THE TWO SEEMS TO BE THE ONE IN THE MEDIA THAN THE ONE IN THE RING!!!!!!!!!! Keep it in the backrooms, if for no other reason than just to spare us hearing all the excuses/nonsense.
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Boxing is first and foremost a business, and anyone who thinks it isn't is living in a Marlon Brando On the Waterfront fantasy world.

 

So if business is to be conducted in public, ask yourself this. How would you like your name, address, and terms and conditions of your employment. including your salary made public so easily anyone can just walk into a library and see it?

 

Better yet, perhaps those nosey bastards that advocate this crap could put themselves to better use, and campaign for banks to do their business publicly. Then the next time they look like fucking up to the tune of hundreds of billions of pounds of taxpayers bail out money, they could be stopped.

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Of course I'm talking baseball here, so I'm probably confusing my UK Buddies, but I like the process by which Salary Arbitration happens in Major League Baseball. If a player isn't elgible for Free Agency, and he and the Team he's bound to aren't agreeing on $$ then they go to arbitration. Both sides present their cases and then the Arbitrator, who's got no allegiance to either side, makes the Judgement and both sides have to live with it. You don't see the Player in question whining in the Press that "I hit so many Home Runs, I deserve this or that,blah,blah,blah" or the Team going "Oh, we're so broke, we can't afford to pay the Hot Dog Vendor, much less you". The arbitrator could even be someone who has a knowledge of the Game, for example Ref Steve Smogger is a Judge in real life and well respected by most in the game, I bet you could get him in the Room with the two parties and have him hear the case and make a decision both sides could live with a HELL of a lot easier than the liklihood that firing press releases back and forth will ever produce anything.
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People have stated that they don't care what the promoters and the boxer's excuses are for not making the big fights, so what makes them think the public are going to care by sitting there and watching it?

 

It may clear up on who is to blame, but really, it's irrelevant who is, in the grand scheme of things.

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Mills Lane's not in the best of health these days I don't think - he had a stroke a few years back and it affected him quite badly at the time. Shame though, as he wasa fantastic referee - anyone who knocks Hopkins out the ring deserves

some kind of medal.

 

What about Carlos Padilla? He refereed the Thrilla, so everything else must pale in comparison so he's not likely to be overawed. Probably couldn't rely on him for Pacquiao vs Mayweather mind you ;)

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The problem with Padilla for me Gav, is he allowed himself to be shoved aside for the Duran / Leonard rematch, because Leonard complained about him knocking his hands down whenever he clinched Roberto.

 

He was a great ref, and shouldn't have allowed himself to be bullied out of a fight IMO.

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Yep, quite right Dave, good shout on Smoger. They could even get Mills ( dont give me no crap Mike ) Lane out of retirement to do the arbitrating.

 

I wish Mills was healthy enough to do that, but sadly he's suffering from the effects of a stroke a few years back, but yes, he'd have been PERFECT for that Role.

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What about Carlos Padilla? He refereed the Thrilla, so everything else must pale in comparison so he's not likely to be overawed. Probably couldn't rely on him for Pacquiao vs Mayweather mind you ;)

 

LOL. I always remember Padilla as being the one guy that concerned himself with Ali's grabbing behind the head (even though even he didn't penalize the "Greatest" for it) an illegality which was something Ali got by with for his entire career but Refs let slide because of who he was.

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Who else knows this shite???

Except you two (davemurphy, McBride) old farts lol

Great stuff!!!

 

Old Fart? I'll have you know I'm middle aged, Edsel *

 

 

* based on your average, run of the mill 108 Year Old grin//

 

No offense meant of course there dave... enjoy reading the intricacies that only you guys know

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