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Ringnews24 Hall of Fame Nominations


The_budweiser
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Ringnews24 Hall of Fame - nominate your fighter

 

If you had one pick of all the boxers there's ever been , who would you let in and why?

 

What rules should we consider?

 

We'll do a vote for each fighter nominated and make our own list up

 

should get some interesting views .............................

 

1 boxer is only to be allowed per member , so dont duplicate someone elses vote but you may add extra as to why they should be allowed.

Edited by the_budweiser
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Sugar Ray Robinson

 

He is without doubt the greatest boxer of all time in my opinion. He fought a whole array of talented opponents, his skill was sublime, he was as much a skillster as he was a brawler....

 

He had an amateur record of 85-1 with 69 KOs (40 in the first round), has over 100 kos, never got KO'd once in either his amateur or pro career, has one of the longest unbeaten streaks in boxing (91), beat ten Hall of Famers...

 

He beat ten Hall of Famers. How many guys today even beat one or two Hall of Famers? He fought many of them several times as well: LaMotta (6 times), Bobo Olsen (4), Fullmer (4), Sammy Angott (3), Basilio (2), Graziano (2), Kid Gavilan (2) and Turpin (2).

 

Up to the age of 35 he lost just 4 times and drew just twice. Meaning from the age of 35 upwards he lost 15 times and drew 4 fights. Obviously meaning the major bulk of his 19 losses and 6 draws were down to age. Yet he still never got KO'd once in his whole career as amateur or pro.

 

And we all know he retired from his fight with Joey Maxim, in which he was attempting to win the World Light heavyweight title, due to the heat, whilst ahead on all 3 scorecards (so hardly a case of him finding an easy escape route).

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I'm going to nominate a fellow Welshman in 'The Mighty Atom' Jimmy Wilde who was World Flyweight Champion. His record according to Boxrec is won 134 (KO 100) + lost 4 (KO 3) + drawn 2; Newspaper Decisions won 4 : lost 1

 

Regarded by many including the Ring magazine as the Greatest Flyweight of all-time and one of the P4P hardest hitters. He often fought men alot bigger than himself.

 

He boxed from 1910 to 1923.

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Sugar Ray Robinson

 

He is without doubt the greatest boxer of all time in my opinion. He fought a whole array of talented opponents, his skill was sublime, he was as much a skillster as he was a brawler....

 

He had an amateur record of 85-1 with 69 KOs (40 in the first round), has over 100 kos, never got KO'd once in either his amateur or pro career, has one of the longest unbeaten streaks in boxing (91), beat ten Hall of Famers...

 

He beat ten Hall of Famers. How many guys today even beat one or two Hall of Famers? He fought many of them several times as well: LaMotta (6 times), Bobo Olsen (4), Fullmer (4), Sammy Angott (3), Basilio (2), Graziano (2), Kid Gavilan (2) and Turpin (2).

 

Up to the age of 35 he lost just 4 times and drew just twice. Meaning from the age of 35 upwards he lost 15 times and drew 4 fights. Obviously meaning the major bulk of his 19 losses and 6 draws were down to age. Yet he still never got KO'd once in his whole career as amateur or pro.

 

And we all know he retired from his fight with Joey Maxim, in which he was attempting to win the World Light heavyweight title, due to the heat, whilst ahead on all 3 scorecards (so hardly a case of him finding an easy escape route).

 

That is what I call the stuff of gods!

Impressive resume that no one will ever come close to matching!

It sounds like Greek mythology.

In awe!

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Muhammad Ali

Considered one of the greatest heavyweight championship boxers of all time. After turning professional, he went on to become the first boxer to win the lineal heavyweight championship three times.

 

Nicknamed 'The Greatest', Ali was involved in several historic boxing matches. In 1999, Ali was crowned "Sportsman of the Century" by Sports Illustrated and "Sports Personality of the Century" by the BBC.

 

Got me into boxing back in 1980.

 

The greatest.

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my choice would have to be my all time hero

 

MARVELOUS MARVIN HAGLER 1973-1987

southpaw

With a record of won 62 (52 ko) lost 3 draw 2

12 world title defences at middleweight

 

 

For me Hagler would get my vote,he was in the golden era where this weight division was just full of great fighters,so many great bouts.The way he took great fighters apart his ko record speaks for its self,for me he had everything boxing skill,superb chin,killer instinct and was one of the most fearless and intimidating boxers of all time.

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Ezzard Charles

 

 

 

More known for his days as a heavyweight reign rather than the weight in which he was at his peak and achieved his greatest wins - the light heavyweight division.He beat top fighters(many of whom are regarded as all time greats) from the middleweight division all the way up to the heavyweight division,including:

 

Teddy Yarosz

Jose Basora

Charley Burley 2x

Joey Maxim 5x

Lloyd Marshall 2x

Archie Moore 3x

Jimmy Bivins 4x

Elmer Ray

Jersey Joe Walcott 2x

Joe Louis

 

 

 

A truly great fighter in every division he competed,and the greatest in light heavyweight divison in my view.

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If he fought in a different era Sam Langford would have won numerous World Titles,from Middleweight up to Heavyweight.Very hard to name just one fighter but Sam had to battle the racial issue,were he had to take it easy on some opponents to earn a living from the game.
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I nominate Roberto Duran.

 

He made his debut as a 16 year old at just under 120 lbs, and in only his 29th fight became the WBA Lightweight champion of world by beating Ken Buchanan, himself a great technician.

 

He ruled the division for 5 years beating all challengers, and avenged his only defeat at the weight by knocking the guy out. Later on they had a rubber match with Duran KOing De Jesus again.

 

He then went up to Welter and took on a guy regarded definitely as the best Welter in the world, if not the best fighter, and won a UD.

 

Part of the reason i nominate Duran is due to his failures as much as his success. The way he bounced back from adversity of his own making was quite remarkable. After dismal showings in a rematch with Leonard, Britains own Kirkland Laing, and Wilfred Benitez, Roberto went in with murderous puncher Pipino Cuevas, and stopped him in four, thus earning him a title shot at Light Middle WBA champ Davey Moore who he stopped in 8 rounds to add his 3rd weight division title.

 

Not content with this Duran immediately went after one of the most feared fighters in game at that time ( Marvin Hagler ) for his Middleweight title. Lets not forget here was a guy that had had 62 fights at the time, he had drawn 2 and lost 2, all of those less than perfect marks on his resume were avenged by brutal knockout, along with another 44 victims, and all at Middleweight.

 

On paper the former Lightweight had no right to be in there, but he went 15 rounds with a very apprehensive Hagler that night, losing by 2, 1, and 1 points on the scorecards.

 

Next up came a crushing defeat to Tommy Hearns for his Light Middle title in 2 rounds, and at 33 years of age that would have been more than enough to happily retire on. World titles in 3 weight divisions when they actually meant something, unlike the cheapened versions of today.

 

Far from it, our little Panamanian wasn't finished yet, at nearly 38 years of age, and giving away 6 inches in height, and 8 inches in reach, he wins a fourth title at Middleweight against future Heavyweight Iran Barkley in what was described as Fight Of The Year in the Ring magazine.

 

From then on, unfortunately Durans career went steadily down hill, due to the combination of his age, and lifestyle, but a truly great fighter, who took inside fighting to another level.

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Wow, one guy and one guy only, this is REALLY tough!!! For me though, the pick has to be Sugar Ray Robinson. I mean, when you talk about Pound for Pound lists, THIS GUY is the reason it was created, simply to give the people of the day some ability to rank SRR with the great HW's and not having to worry about weight. All of those mentioned are GREATS and in my Top 15 or 20 All Time, but for me, there's only one guy at the Top!
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  • 4 weeks later...

Pete Sanstol

An unheralded legend of the ring who changed from being a whirlwind early in his career to being a wonderfully skilled fighter. He wasn't stopped once in 110 fights (96-6-8) took a version of the Bantamweight Title. Lost a razor thin decision to Panama Al Brown then avenged it 4 years later. Came back after all most 7 years to win his final 2 bouts.

Tough, energetic and a forgotten ring icon.

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THere are so many to pick from.

 

How about Henry Armstrong. He won the Featherweight, Lightweight and then Welterweight Titles and fought a draw when he fought for the Middleweight Title. If he won that bout, and most people thought he did, he would have held 4 out of trhe 8 titles at that time. From 1937 to September of 1940, he went 59-1-1 with 51 KO's, including 27 KO's in a row. Both his loss and draw were very disputed.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ken Buchanan - A Look Back At A True Great

Total fights 69 , Wins 61, Losses 8

 

Ken Buchanan

 

Ken Buchanan was born on June 28, 1945 in Northfield, Edinburgh. He joined the Sparta club aged eight and turned professional in 1965 aged 20. Before turning pro, Buchanan was the 1965 ABA featherweight champion.

 

Professional Career

 

At the age of 20 years old, Ken's burning ambition to be a boxer started to unfold. His debut fight was at London's National Sporting Club were he took on Brian Tonks (1-1-0). The fight was over fairly quickly when Buchanan won by a second round KO. This was the first win of the unknown boxer from Scotland, but it wouldn't take long until Ken Buchanan's name was known on a bigger stage.

 

Ken spent a lot of his early career fighting in England, mainly London's National Sporting Club where ten of his first sixteen bouts were held. Ken's next fight was held outside England for the first time, it was in his homeland with Glasgow's Central Hotel being the venue. The fight was for the vacant Scottish area lightweight title, the challenger John McMillan (6-10-3) lost a close decision to Buchanan. This was victorious Ken's first belt as a professional boxer and his seventeenth straight victory. With only sixteen months experience as a professional boxer things were looking bright for the young Scotsman, but what did the future have ahead for Ken?

 

http://ringnews24.com/index.php/writers-columns/73-thebudweiser/249-ken-buchanan-a-look-back-at-a-true-great.html

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http://i.cdn.turner.com/sivault/multimedia/photo_gallery/0911/boxing.top.ten.greatest.pound.for.pound.fighters.alltime/images/ricardo-lopez.jpg

 

 

Ricardo López

 

 

Statistics:

 

Real name: Ricado López Nava

Nickname(s): El Finito (The Fine One)

Rated at Flyweight, Light Flyweight, Minimumweight

Nationality: Mexican

Birth date: July 25, 1966 (age 44)

Birth place: Cuernavaca, Mexico

Stance: Orthodox

 

 

Boxing record: 51-0-1 w/ 38 KO's

 

 

Ricardo “El Finito” López Nava (born July 25, 1966) is a retired Mexican boxer. As a professional, he defended the WBC Strawweight Championship a record 21 times. He also won the WBA and WBO championship of the same weight class. Lopez also won the IBF Light Flyweight Championship and defended it twice before retiring. He is also the father of undefeated Flyweight prospect Alonso López.

 

(source: Wikipedia)

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Topic Locked for the moment. Voting will now commence.

 

Boxers who receive the Yes vote will appear in the topic in the history section. The voting topics will appear in the World boxing forum and be moved after a few days to the history section.

 

Thank you to all those who nominated a fighter - now let the voting and debating begin.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

Mike Tyson

 

For me he was the most exciting boxer of all time. he had everything a fighter should:- devastating power, lightening speed, electric combinations, relentless agression, and his defnce was impressive too

 

he was the reason i got into boxing

 

Big-up the big-man

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